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Posts Tagged “employee onboarding”

Via Real Business : Does your employee onboarding go with a bang, or fizzle out like a damp squib?

It’s understandable that businesses want to get new talent onboard quickly, but beware you don’t immediately dampen the enthusiasm of your new hires under a deluge of paperwork.

Taking on new hires should add a spark to your business during the employee onboarding process, rather than it feeling like it’s burning out like disappointing roman candle. For Bonfire Night, we light up a box of fireworks to focus on the different kinds of onboarding experience that businesses offer onboardees when starting a new role..

The Rocket – getting talent onboard quickly

Rockets rush up into the sky, in an explosion of noise, to create dazzling and sometimes overwhelming displays.

It’s understandable that businesses want to get new talent onboard quickly, but beware you don’t immediately dampen the enthusiasm of your new hires under a deluge of paperwork.

Sending out a huge bundle of contracts, offer letters and supporting documents can be overwhelming for candidates, and can mean that you spend time chasing their return.

Make use of templates for things like offer details and contracts to ensure details are accurate and up to date.

Think about which documents are necessary and relevant to your onboardee, and which topics are better covered when they start working for you.

Using digital technology such as webonboarding makes it easier for candidates to complete, sign and return documents so that you can get them onboard without delays.

Catherine Wheel – whirling around to ensure the correct people are involved

Does hiring a new starter send you off in a flurry, firing off sparks in a whirl of chaos?

If getting someone new into your business means HR, Managers, IT, security, finances and contract departments running around in a state of confusion, then onboarding planning and organisation can help stop things spiralling out of control.

Having a central resource for information, and a well thought through onboarding process helps to save time and eliminate mistakes during employee onboarding. Using online software such as webonboarding can ensure everyone knows what’s happening and understands their role in welcoming a new employee to the business.

The Blaster – onboarding starts from the moment the role has been offered

Shooting off with a screech, all goes silent with this firework until it explodes with a boom and crackle of sparks.

Does your onboarding process start off with great intentions and then go quiet? Do onboardees drop out before they start work, causing the whole process to come to a crashing halt?

Sometimes it can take several weeks, or even months, between making an offer and new starters turning up ready to work. If they don’t hear from your organisation, onboardees may get cold feet, or be tempted away by another offer.

Onboarding should start from the moment the role has been offered. Engage with your onboardees early and keep in touch throughout their notice period. Make them feel like they are already part of your business and give them an idea of what to expect when they start work for you.

The Sparkler – keep the sparkle alive in the onboarding process

This all-round firework favourite dazzles and delights.

Remember, remember offering onboardees a sparkling start to a new job means your organisation should make an effort to impress them as much as they impress you. By demonstrating how your business values its employees from the moment you make an offer you can start to make them feel part of the team.

First impressions can have a big impact, and staff who are unhappy in their new role will quickly decide to move on. Those who have had an effective onboarding process and who feel part of your organisation are likely to stay longer.

Overall, communication is key and can help new starters to begin adding their own sparkle to your business success story.

Via Human Resource Director : Why are so many onboarding experiences bad?

Most employees look forward to starting a new job. But what if the introduction turns into a bad experience?

A recent online survey of 4,000 office workers in the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand by cloud-based webonboarding.com revealed that over a third of new starters have had bad onboarding experiences in their organisations.

These experiences led them to regret joining the firm or to leave the job altogether. In fact, 22% of respondents changed their minds before their official start.

For example, 36% of those surveyed said they did not have basic equipment such as a computer on their first day. This caused them to feel like they were joining an unprofessional company.

Fifty-six percent of workers said they did not receive full training and have a sufficient induction plan – when support is seen as pivotal to the overall development of a new employee.

“The findings of our research have highlighted extreme flaws within the onboarding process that are having detrimental effects on global businesses. Major themes throughout were neglect, disorganisation and a lack of engagement,” said Adam Reynolds, CEO of webonboarding.

“Remarkably it seems to boil down to businesses failing to invest the time and focus you would expect to receive in the first few months of joining a new organisation.”

Among those surveyed, 71% said they would have settled into their role quicker had there been a better process in place.

Sixty-nine percent said a good onboarding process would have improved their overall job performance.

Reynolds highlighted the need to prepare all required equipment, materials and training for increased engagement of the new employee.

“Our aim with these results is to make businesses sit up and listen,” he said. “We wouldn’t treat our customers like this, so why would we treat new staff with such disregard?”

via Business News Daily : What Does Poor Onboarding Really Do to Your Team?

Getting your new hires started off on the right foot requires more than just offering them a quick tour of the office and sending them on their way. Giving employees the best chance at future success requires a successful and thorough onboarding program, according to new research from CareerBuilder.

Unfortunately, a number of employers aren’t taking those steps. The study found that 36 percent of organizations do not have a structured onboarding process in place.

Not having any process in place can cause a number of negative consequences for both the employee and employer. Specifically, 16 percent of HR managers said it lowers their company’s productivity, 14 percent said it brings on greater inefficiencies and 12 percent said it leads to higher employee turnover.

Lower employee morale, lower levels of employee engagement, lower confidence among employees, a lack of trust within the organization and missed revenue targets are among the other negative impacts of not having a thorough onboarding program.

Onboarding Process

“While onboarding is a critical component of setting new employees up for success from day one, this study shows some companies are neglecting fundamentals in the onboarding process – and running into serious consequences that can impact the bottom line,” Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at CareerBuilder, said in a statement.

The study discovered employers use varying strategies when it comes to their onboarding process. Nearly half of those surveyed provide an overview of their process and how things work; 45 percent offer individual, ongoing training; 43 percent introduce new hires to key employees; and 42 percent provide an introduction to the company culture.

Additionally, more than 30 percent have a team welcome, ensure the new employee’s workspace and technology is ready before they arrive, and have goals and expectations for the employee’s role with defined milestones and success metrics. Some employers also provide detailed information on the company and growth opportunities and assign a mentor to the new hire.

The research revealed that HR employees would benefit from including more automation and technology into their onboarding systems. More than 40 percent of the HR managers surveyed who don’t capture onboarding information electronically spend three hours or more per employee manually collecting and processing the data, while 16 percent spend five or more hours. 

Onboarding Process

Those who collect all the information manually say they suffer from heavier workloads and higher stress levels. In addition, it leads to missing information, delayed start dates and candidates who end up walking away from the job because the process took too long.

“Employers need to establish a comprehensive checklist for every new employee and incorporate more automation to provide a better, more efficient experiences for employees, their managers and HR,” Haefner said.

Overall, one-quarter of employers have an onboarding process that lasts just a day, or less, with 26 percent having programs that last about a week. Twenty-one percent have an onboarding process that lasts one month, with 11 percent extending it over the course of at least three months.

The study was based on surveys of 2,300 hiring managers and human resource professionals across a variety of industries and company sizes in the private sector.

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