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Via CNN : The best skills to have on your resume

Writing a good resume is a tricky balancing act.

You want to impress recruiters by highlighting your skills and experiences, but you don’t want to overwhelm them with too much information either.

The key to striking the right balance and making your resume stand out is to include skills that are tailored to the position you’re applying for.

“A resume is a foot in the door,” Vicki Salemi, a career expert at Monster, told CNN Business. A well-tailored resume that highlights skills that are most important for the role and that you can back up with specific accomplishments or experiences will intrigue a recruiter and help get you through the door.

Here are other tips for an eye-catching resume:

Determine which skills to emphasize

The most effective way to tailor your resume for a specific role is to identify the top skills listed in the job description and highlight them on your own resume. Also, make sure to mirror the language used in the job description. This should help get your resume past the electronic screening that many companies put resumes through to scan for keywords before a recruiter looks at them.

Typically companies will list the most important skills and responsibilities needed for the job first so focus your resume on those.

Companies are “basically providing you with a cheat sheet,” said Salemi.

Of course, only highlight the skills that you actually possess and do not lie. “Lies catch up with you,” warned Amanda Augustine, career advice expert for TopResume.

If the job description is vague, reach out to people at the company or to those who work in the industry and ask them to elaborate on the skills that would be necessary for the role. Or find similar job descriptions and take note of the keywords that routinely pop up.

Maintain a balance between hard and soft skills

Make sure to have a combination of both hard and soft skills on your resume.

Soft skills are the set of behaviors and personality traits that you use everyday, like collaboration and problem-solving, while hard skills tend to be function-specific and technical like computer programming. Both sets of skills are important. As much as employers want to hire someone qualified for the role, they also want to know whether you’ll be a good cultural fit.

“When interviewing candidates with nearly identical resumes, interviewers will most likely pick the candidate that fits better with the group,” said Salemi.

Keep the skills section of your resume limited to between six and eight skills, said Steve Arneson, author of “What Your Boss Really Wants from You.” You don’t want to overwhelm a recruiter. If you want to include more, weave your non-technical skills into your professional history.

Back skills up with evidence

Don’t just submit a resume with a list of skills and job titles. You also have to substantiate them with concrete examples.

When you’re describing a previous role, include any relevant accomplishments. “The best way to do this is to quantify or tell a story,” Augustine said.

For example, if you’re stating that you’re an effective salesperson, you should include whether you won salesperson of the month or that you expanded your territory by a certain percentage.

You should also introduce each skill with an active verb — such as “analyzed,” “organized,” “delivered,” “created” and “developed” — to keep the recruiter’s attention.

Develop the skills you’re lacking

Don’t get discouraged if you’re lacking certain skills that are key for the positions you’re applying to. Instead, work on developing them.

For example, if you’re applying for a position at a hospital, try to get free online demos for key software skills like patient scheduling. Also take online courses on websites like LinkedIn Learning or Coursera.

Hard skills are easier to learn, but even soft skills can be developed over time. You just need to find an effective way to learn them and get that across in your resume.

Via OnRec : How to Write a Perfect Resume: Best Advice for Students

This will sound like a cliché to many people: a good resume gets you halfway through the door.

People assume they are aware of the statement above, but few take the time to actualize it. Writing a resume is normal and there is nothing new we can teach you about what to include or the structure of your resume. However, we can give you free resume tips to help you enhance your resume. The hiring process is changing and more companies are using tech bots to compare resumes and pick the best ones. So, you need to prepare yourself and deliver something that will attract the attention of the tech bots and managers (those still preferring the manual process). Below are our resume tips for college students.

Review Examples

Writing a good resume starts with reading a good resume. So, before you start working on your resume, get to read good resume examples. You can read resumes that are specific to your career or read resumes for all careers and pick what stands out for you. However, make sure the resumes you review are in line with certain careers. This will help you understand how to approach different situations if in case you find yourself changing fields. These resumes will help you choose a style that not only fits you but also helps you capture what is important. You can find these examples on LinkedIn or resume writing services.

Start with Important Information and Only Include your Most Valuable Information

This is all about prioritization. Your potential employer needs to see your most important information first. Everything that makes you stand out from the other applicants needs to come first. The relevant experiences you have, need to come first. Starting with your most valuable information grabs the attention of the reader. When you intrigue the reader, they want to know more about you, and this means your chances of getting a face-to-face interview increase. As you are looking for resume strategies, do not go any further if you do not understand the seriousness of this tip. Prioritize your information and you will find yourself in a job soon.

Add Jobs you had in the Last Years

While listing your previous jobs, start with the most recent. Here, offer details of your last jobs but do not go past 15 years. If you are an intern, include this piece of information. Your potential employer needs to know your history. So, include your previous job and their expectations. Do not lie in your resume thinking you are increasing your chances of landing a job. You will do an exceptional job if you maintain your integrity and only include truthful information.

Develop your Language Skills

Using the right language or showcasing your language skills is one of the most important tips on how to write a great resume. You cannot express yourself if you do not develop your language skills. A resume gets you halfway through the door. However, before you submit your resume, there is the writing process that you cannot skip. It is possible to have someone else write your resume, but what will you do in a face-to-face interview? Your career path may not involve a lot of talking or report writing. But you need to know how to express yourself. So, growing your language skills is important.

Education

Education is an essential part of your resume. You need to include it every time you are writing your resume. If you are still a student and in need of help with writing your resume, you can place your request with an online essay writing service. However, the most important thing here is to understand how to include education in your resume. You need to prioritize education and this means you start with your most recent academic achievement. In this section, include the name of institution, name of your degree, your major, year of graduation, and honors.

Include Your Skills and Experience

Your skills and experience are important and you have to include them in your resume. However, as a student, you may not have any experience to include in your resume. Well, some have and some do not. If you have some experience, do not hesitate to share it. When it comes to skills, everyone has their strengths and skills that are unique to them. A resume is a way to convince your potential or future employers to hire you. So, do not be afraid to include your skills. A resume for college students with no experience should not be set for dismissal because one can share their skills, and make their resumes stand out.

Include Your Contact Information

You should work on writing all your contact information in your resume. This makes it easier for potential employers to find you and hire you. So, give your full name, phone number, email address, your city, zip code, and street address. If you have a profile on any professional website, it is good practice to share this as well. Offer your potential employers enough information about yourself.

Proofread and Edit

Never send your resume out without proofreading and editing it. You will not leave your potential employers with a good picture of you if you submit a resume with spelling or grammatical errors. You can either use proofreading tools, grammar-checking tools, or request editing services from a platform like write my essay for me . On this platform, you will have an expert review your resume and enhance it for you. This will be at a fee but in the end, you have a resume that is error-free.

In conclusion, it is important to take your time and learn how to write your resume. Everything in life is a process and learning how to write a good resume is a process. When you start the process, do not give up. Write with the best attitude and soon you will be able to submit resumes that not only put you halfway through the opportunity door but kick the door wide open.

Via Forbes : Six Tips To Make Your Resume Stand Out

Have you written your resume but aren’t sure that you have the right content? Have you modified it a few times and had people read it, but it just doesn’t have that extra oomph that you think it needs? If you answered “yes” to one or both of these questions, you’re not alone.

Your resume is meant to share enough information about you to help you get an opportunity to reiterate or elaborate on your knowledge, skills and abilities at an interview. As a career coach who’s reviewed thousands of resumes and served in various hiring capacities, I’ve learned the do’s and don’ts of how to make a resume stand out. Here are six tips:

1. Determine what aspect of your career you need to showcase to demonstrate your knowledge, skills and abilities.

Usually when a company posts an open position, it includes a list of duties, required knowledge and responsibilities. Pay attention to information elsewhere in the job description as well, and read the company’s reports, minutes of strategic planning sessions and other publically available documents. And don’t miss an opportunity to speak to the person who previously held the position, if you can.

Armed with this information, you’ll have a better idea of what knowledge, skills and abilities to showcase when summarizing your career experience, volunteer experience, awards and any other recognition you’ve received. For example, if you’re applying for a management or leadership position, try to showcase experiences that demonstrate your ability to manage and/or lead.

2. Ask yourself, “Why is this statement important?”

When preparing your resume, continually ask yourself, “Why is this statement important?” Share only high-level activities that demonstrate your ability to perform. A way to demonstrate this ability might be to include a statement like “Continually recognized for neutralizing potentially hazardous situations that would have resulted in fiscal deficits and instead enabling corporate leaders to secure multi-agency contracts averaging $30K.”

3. Include activities that showcase your value.

Hand-in-hand with tip No. 2, include activities that best showcase your value. Ask yourself, “Why is this activity important?” and “If it weren’t performed at the required level or better, what would have happened?” Case in point: If you hadn’t handled a matter expeditiously using your project management skills, what would have been the organizational outcome?

Identifying what activities and experience a company will find valuable is sometimes hard to do when you’re new to the job market or career path, so do your research: Speak to someone who was in the position previously, review the position description and look up the company online to gain a better understanding of the scope of the enterprise. Your research will also demonstrate your ability to take initiative. It shows the interviewer that you’re determined to advance in a career and don’t want just a job.

Another way to showcase your value is by adding a career objective or qualification statement at the beginning of your resume. When doing so, make sure the content of your resume backs up or reinforces what you write. For example, your qualification statement could read: “Extraverted visionary seeking to further extend strategic planning skills to the health care profession.” Just make sure that you include on your resume work experience that reinforces your strategic planning abilities.

4. Share the actions, purpose and results of each activity.

Wherever possible, when you list an activity under each position you’ve held, provide actions, a purpose and results. You can use a bulleted list or a paragraph to get your meaning across. When using bullet points, a good rule of thumb is to include three to four bullet points.

Take care not to write like a job description. For example, don’t write: “Reviewed manuscripts each day.” Use powerful action words and adjectives. But refrain from using words and terms that you don’t normally use. Be you. Instead of “Reviewed manuscripts each day,” you could write, “Successfully reviewed voluminous manuscripts daily ahead of prescribed deadlines for the purpose of justifying $1.4B of expansion projects to an executive director.” Doesn’t the second example provide a clearer picture of what you accomplished?

5. Don’t use “I.”

Avoid using “I” on your resume. Why? First, a person who’s reviewing hundreds of applicants’ resumes is likely skimming them. So aim to be as succinct as possible. Second, if a machine is scanning your resume, it will likely be programmed to locate keywords. Pronouns aren’t keywords, so save space for more pertinent information. Instead of writing statements beginning with phrases like “I accomplished,” use verb phrases like in the previous examples I shared above: “Successfully reviewed” and “Continually recognized for.”

6. Instead of using acronyms, explain or define the terms.

Acronyms often stand for highly technical terms that only a company insider would understand, so make sure you explain their meaning whenever possible. Doing this not only demonstrates your understanding of the work, ideology or processes but also your ability to help the layperson understand complicated terms. This is an ability that may be expected if the position involves briefing high-level executives or officials.

If you can’t explain the acronym with one simple sentence, though, then just write out what it stands for.

With these tips, you can effectively tell your story, captivate your audience and provide insight on how you can become an asset to a company. So give your resume the boost that can help you land your next position and advance your career.

Via Forbes : 21 Ways To Improve Your Résumé

Your résumé needs to get through the applicant tracking system and then get selected by the recruiter or HR person doing the initial screening. When your résumé finally makes into someone’s hands, it typically gets just a 15 second glance according Human Resources and hiring managers. 15 Seconds! You have got to garner their interest fast or you are sunk. For Baby Boomers with a lot of experience you can easily make mistakes that keep your résumé lost in cyberspace or never reaching the hiring manager’s eyes. I’ve written over 5,000 résumés and hired hundreds of people personally so I’ve seen most of the errors job hunters make that torpedo their résumé.

Your résumé can be a door opener, or a career stopper. These 21 tips come from hiring managers.

  1. Emphasize RESULTS! Employers stressed that results achieved matter the most. Lace your résumé with the accomplishments and outcomes you’ve delivered in past positions. Show the impact you had and your productivity by including details concerning money earned, or time or dollars saved. Use numbers to reflect, how much, how many, and percentage of gain or reduction. Innovations matter. List all new products, services, design, processes or system improvements you’ve made.
  2. Use KEYWORDS! Many companies use an applicant tracking system (ATS) in making their initial résumé selection. Thus keywords are vital to being found. Review the jobs you’ve done and note the key industry buzz words and vital work tasks. Your résumé keywords should include your skills, competencies, relevant credentials. Essentially, keywords should be words that, at a glance, will show the hiring manager that you are a good fit for the job.
  3. Focus the résumé. It’s imperative to use a job title for the career objective to identify the name of the job being applied for. It’s most effective to create a different résumé for each different job title (i.e., one résumé for Project Manager, another for Engineer) and only incorporate the information pertinent to doing that stated job. Avoid crowding your résumé with any non-related information.
  4. Be concise. No long job descriptions. Say exactly what you mean, using the smallest number of words to make the point. State only the specific qualifications you have to best perform the job advertised, employers say they quickly eliminate any broad scope or generalized résumés submitted.
  5. Limit Résumé to TWO pages. Employers stated that they are primarily interested in worked done in the last 5-7 years no matter what level position the candidate applied for. Cover in detail the major job duties performed noting results achieved. Be a skillful editor, deleting experience over 20 years old or anything not relevant or helpful to your securing a particular position and at the level you seek.
  6. Use a bullet style format. Employers can gather more info faster and prefer the bullets layout over the paragraph style format.
  7. Add a Summary of Qualifications section. Employers read this first. Encapsulate your most marketable skills and experience into four to six sentences so this section is a mini-verbal business card that details what you are bringing to the new employer.
  8. Note your skillset first. Look through employers’ job ads to uncover the major work tasks they require. Work tasks are what recruiters and HR folks search for first, so put these in your opening sentence under work experience.
  9. Don’t hide graduation years. Mature workers worry that employers will discard their résumé if they look too old. Yet most employers want a grad date so they can verify you actually did graduate. Over 30% of people lie about a degree they never earned on their résumé. Therefore, more employers are verifying backgrounds before hiring.
  10. Make it visually appealing. Keep the formatting of your résumé readable, sharp and professional. Make sure there is adequate white space between points. Use a clean easy to read font like Arial with a preferred font size of 12. Save it as a PDF to preserve the formatting.
  11. Do not lie or embellish! A new survey from Career Builder of more than 2,500 hiring managers found that 75% have HR managers have caught applicants lying on their résumé. This red flag in almost all cases eliminated hiring the candidate from that particular position. The most common fib seems to be embellishing skills or capabilities and taking liberties when describing the scope of their responsibilities. Some people even claimed to be employed by companies they never really worked for. Be warned. Employers are doing extensive background checks these days and they often uncover your lies during interviews and reference checks. State your skills, qualifications, education, and experience as positively as possible without misstating the truth.
  12. Clarify a Job title. If your job responsibilities are not adequately described by your company’s job title, then alter that title and indicate your responsibilities with a title in more appropriate terms i.e. IT Systems Analyst, instead of Tech lll.
  13. Use action verbs. Start each sentence with a descriptive action verb — such as directed, organized, established, created, planned, etc. They add power to your sentences. And, never use “I” on the résumé. Action verbs and short impact sentences gather more attention.
  14. No abbreviations or acronyms. Spell out names of schools, cities, business terms, abbreviations, and titles completely, as employers may not recognize the exactly what the letters stand for.
  15. Use the correct tense. In all your sentences, use past tense words since they imply that you “have done it” before. Employers focus on past results even if you are still currently performing the duty at your job, write the résumé using the past tense only.
  16. Skip tables. Do not use a table to list competencies, skill sets or job descriptions. Most of the electronic applicant tracking systems that employers use can’t read them and so tables copy as blank sections.
  17. Avoid graphics. Artistic designs, color inks, emojis, and photos should be avoided. Most electronic résumé software can not read designs, or color ink correctly and often eliminate or change anything they see that is not text.
  18. Don’t advertise negative information. The résumé is the wrong place to advertise that you were laid off, fired, or had an extended illness. Never state why you left a position; simply list the dates of employment.
  19. PROOFREAD! Careful read and make your résumé flawless. No spelling errors, mistakes or typos. Many HR managers reported they do not hire offenders. Don’t trust computer spell checkers since a correctly spelled word like “sea” would go unnoticed by your computer but would be incorrectly read if you meant to say “see.”
  20. Cover your bases. Use your networking abilities and LinkedIn connections to find the employer you are targeting for a specific job and use the connections to email them a copy of your résumé.
  21. No tag lines. Employers know you’ll provide references if they request them, therefore it is not necessary to put “References upon request” at the end of your résumé.

FINAL TEST — Are employers calling? Is your résumé getting results with employers calling on appropriate jobs you are actually qualified to perform? No over qualified calls or underqualified options. If not, start editing and rewriting to improve your résumé so it is the best possible advertisement about you and your skills.

Via The Ladders : How to write a job-winning resume, with tips from a professional resume writer

To avoid the lengthy job-hunting process, your resume needs to have the ‘wow’ factor. It needs to hook the employer and make them want to know more.

Looking for a new job is a full-time job on its own.

It can be a drawn-out process and weeks of automated email responses saying you have been unsuccessful.

You’ll ask yourself questions like: Why? Didn’t I meet all the criteria? Where did I fall short?

And usually, more often than not, you get generic feedback, if at all.

It takes a lot of careful selection to put together a tailored resume to give you the best chances at landing an interview, and even then, you might not be shortlisted.

Your resume could be letting you down.

To avoid the lengthy job-hunting process, your resume needs to have the ‘wow’ factor. It needs to hook the employer and make them want to know more about you.

Follow my CRABS (Chunkability, Relevance, Accuracy, Brevity, Scannable) approach for writing a job-winning resume.

CHUNKABILITY

Is your resume concise and easy to read?

Too often resumes read like a person’s life story with every single detail, every job held and every responsibility.

Are there areas that are repeated or saying the same thing in a different way that could be combined or condensed?

If your work history is across different industries or skills-based, can you combine certain roles into sections with sub-headings to make it easier to navigate?

RELEVANCE

Does your resume tick off the key selection criteria?

Look at the position description and job advertisement and identify the keywords and values the employer is looking for.

Cross-check your resume to ensure it contains these keywords and demonstrates how well you deliver in these areas through your major achievements.

Go through your resume with a fine-tooth comb keeping these criteria in mind and if the content doesn’t address it you need to cull, cull, cull.

There is no point wasting words on irrelevant details that add no value – make sure your resume is a marketing tool to sell you. Relevance is key.

ACCURACY

Be accurate when quantifying your major achievements and avoid generic statements.

If you can quantify results it adds credibility and ensures that it is unique to you, and not a copy and paste job.

Spell check. Need I say more? It is a simple step but often forgotten, yet it’s a big indicator of laziness and lack of attention to detail. So many capable candidates fail to do this, and their resume goes straight into the bin.

Limit the use of abbreviations because not everyone will know what they stand for.

Lastly, ask yourself who will be reading your resume – will it be the technical specialist, a human resources manager or recruiter? – and always tailor it to your audience.

BREVITY

Make sure you use targeted statements.

Too many resumes are unnecessarily filled with waffle and words like ‘however’, ‘key responsibilities’, ‘as well as’.

If you read a sentence and you can remove those filler words and the sentence still makes sense, then delete them. You will have more impact if you can be as succinct as possible.

Keep your resume up to three pages long (possibly four for senior roles) and include no more than the past 10 years of experience.

SCANNABLE

Formatting plays a key role, so making your resume scannable is key.

Make use of dot points, as recruiters love them, and use an easy-to-read font such as Arial size 12.

Add testimonials that highlight your strengths and reflect on key criteria for the role you’re applying for – just be sure to seek permission to include them first.

REFRESH THAT RESUME

These tips offer a great starting point to help write your job-winning resume and to get you thinking about your resume from recruiter’s perspective.

Your resume is all about giving a high-level snapshot of who you are, your skills and experience, and how you can add value to a company.

Be sure to demonstrate what you contributed in your previous roles in your achievements section and let the CRABS approach guide you in your writing.

All the best in your job search.

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